Blog

Hospice of the Red River Valley is a not-for-profit hospice that provides intensive comfort care to enhance quality of life for individuals with life-limiting illnesses. Our site shares patient, caregiver and volunteer stories—demonstrating how hospice allows people to live well, and tools and resources about end-of-life and grief.

Ethel Wischer

Heirlooms Thrift & Gift Volunteer Enjoys Community & Respite in Giving Back

For the past 15 years, Ethel Wischer has spent Thursday afternoons volunteering in the stockroom at Heirlooms Thrift & Gift, a resale store benefitting Hospice of the Red River Valley. Every week she joyfully secures an apron around her waist, rolls up her sleeves and carefully unpacks, washes, shines and polishes the generously donated items. …

 

Kriston Wenzel

Hospice Grief Specialist Companions Individuals Through Their Grief

We recognize that the death of a loved one can be one of the most stressful life events a person can experience—whether the death is expected or not. Grief is a natural part of life, but it affects everyone differently, including how a person feels, thinks, behaves—even what they believe. Part of Hospice of the …

 

Help Child Through Grief

3 Practical Suggestions to Help Your Child Through Grief

by Kriston Wenzel, LSW, CT Helping children and young adults face life challenges can be difficult, and adding a death to the mix makes it even more complicated. Communication is one of the most effective ways to help children through hard situations. Throughout my years of experience as a Hospice bereavement specialist, I’ve had a …

 

Ole Barten

Larger than Life: Vergas Community Honors Beloved Resident through Memorial Ride

Described by many as “larger than life” both in stature and spirit, Richard ‘Ole’ Barten was straight-forward, soft-hearted and full of integrity. He reveled in nature and outdoor spaces; he enjoyed traditional Minnesota pastimes like bow hunting and motorcycle riding. His life was steeped in Native American traditions, faith, a decades-long career with the railroad, …

 

10 Tips for Families on How to Handle the Death of a Loved One

by Cathy Miller, LSW I was 30 years old and faced with the sudden reality that my parents may not live forever. My dad was diagnosed with mesothelioma at 55. After an 11-day hospital stay, he said, “I am never going back there again.” He opted to spend his time hunting and fishing rather than …

 

5 Conversation Starters to Talk about Death, Dying & End-of-Life Preferences

by Brenda Iverson I am a planner. Simple things, like planning out the week’s meals for our family, help me feel prepared for the hustle and bustle of the week ahead, especially with two teenagers in the house. We also make plans for many significant and life-changing events in our lives, including weddings, babies, vacations …